AIAA ASCEND 2023 Papers: Liquid Rockets and Solar Parasols

We presented two papers at the 2023 AIAA ASCEND conference in Las Vegas on October 25, featuring the work of our interns William Huang and Aniesha Dyce. All GN&C analysis and simulations were performed using our Spacecraft Control Toolbox, while the parasol model was built in Fusion 360.

Thanks to the session chairs Dr. Erica Rodgers (NASA), Evan A. Bell (NASA), Melodie Yashar (ICON), and John Carsten (MEI). Our sessions included a variety of intriguing research including optical payload development, robotics from GITAI, deep space internet, a student smallsat design using a solar sail and a study of perceived spaciousness in astronaut living spaces.

Here are the abstracts for our papers:

All Liquid Fuel Space Launch System

The recent Artemis launch demonstrated the performance of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), specifically the SLS Block 1 configuration. The launch vehicle has a central core stage with four RS-25 engines and two 5-segment solid rocket boosters (SRB). The second stage uses an RL10C-3 engine. This paper presents a conceptual design of an SLS variant using the same core vehicle but with five liquid boosters, each with a single RS-25D. This launch vehicle provides the same performance with two-thirds the launch mass. This is conceptually similar to some Shuttle variants. This paper provides an analysis and comparison of the launch vehicles’ performance and presents simulation results. In addition, it shows how the add-on boosters can be used independently as part of a high-performance two-stage to orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle. Payload and performance are given for the single boosters with a 2nd stage powered by an RL10C-3 engine. Comparison with other commercial available launch vehicles show that the TSTO vehicle proposed in this paper is a competitive in terms of the payload mass it is able to carry to low earth orbit (LEO). This launch vehicle is more complex than comparable launch vehicles. Additional work will be required to determine the cost per kilogram of the two stage launch vehicle and the cost of operating SLS with liquid boosters.

DOI: 10.2514/6.2023-4742

Gateway Momentum Unloading using a Solar Parasol

This paper describes the use of a robotic arm for momentum unloading and orbit control. A panel is attached to the end of a robotic arm. It is positioned, in angle and position, to optimize unloading. The robot arm can move about the spacecraft giving additional degrees of freedom. The panel can be stowed when necessary. The work is based partially on a technology developed by the Canadian Space Agency. The parasol can be grabbed and deployed by the robot arm whenever it is needed, to remove momentum. When it is not needed the parasol is retracted and stowed. The system can be used in high orbits for both momentum and orbit control using solar pressure. In lower orbits, it can use atmospheric drag for the same purpose. This paper focuses on its use for momentum unloading for the NASA Gateway space station. The paper includes a complete GN&C design using single gimbal CMGs with thrusters for orbit control and backup attitude control. The dynamical equations are derived and simulation results are presented for all modes of operation. This includes an optimal attitude profile for minimizing solar and gravity gradient torques over the Gateway orbit.

DOI: 10.2514/6.2023-4781
CAD model of Gateway with a solar parasol in orbit around with moon.
Gateway with Notional Solar Parasol

It was great to be part of the ASCEND conference and share our work!

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